Stokes County Humane Society sees influx of pet surrenders and castoffs


By Amanda Dodson - adodson@thestokesnews.com



Advocate and volunteer Emily Burgess fostered 345 animals through the Stokes County Humane Society in 2017.


Courtesy photos

When an animal is rescued through the Stokes County Humane Society it’s taken into foster care, vetted, given age appropriate vaccines, dewormed and groomed.


Courtesy photos

On December 28, three newborn puppies, just a couple hours old, were dropped off in a box at a local bar. They’ll be cared for by the Stokes County Humane Society until they’re healthy and old enough to be adopted.


Courtesy photos

Stokes County Humane Society rescued 500 animals in 2017, 100 more than the previous year.


Courtesy photos

Stokes County Humane Society (SCHS) has rescued 25 puppies since Christmas and the numbers and phone calls continue to come in.

“We have more requests than we can possibly help given our size. Being a foster based rescue made up of volunteers, our space is very limited,” said longtime volunteer Emily Burgess.

Burgess explained rescues are busier after the holidays because people receive puppies as Christmas presents and when the novelty wears off, they aren’t prepared for the responsibility that comes with it.

“Backyard breeders breed their females on purpose to sell Christmas puppies. The ones that aren’t sold are dumped in shelters or surrendered to rescues, or simply abandoned,” she said.

When an animal is rescued through SCHS it’s taken into foster care, vetted, given age appropriate vaccines, dewormed and groomed. The animal remains in private foster homes until it’s healthy and old enough to be adopted or sent to larger no-kill rescues.

“The process can take anywhere from a few days to a few months depending on the age and health of animals in care.”

On December 28, Burgess received a box of three crying puppies, only a few hours old that had been dropped off at a local bar. The newborn puppies will require foster care for at least seven to eight weeks.

Last year SCHS rescued an estimated 500 animals, an increase of more than 100 since 2016.

Burgess said the community can help solve the problem by spaying and neutering their pets and adopting animals from local rescues instead of buying from breeders or pet stores. Folks may also assist by donating detergent, high protein puppy food, training pads, doggie diapers, blankets, dog beds, toys, paper towels.

“Supporting the local shelter, the future shelter, Spay Stokes and Stokes County Humane Society will help ensure that we’re able to keep our doors opens to all the castoffs. We’re working together to solve the overpopulation problems in Stokes County,” she said.

SCHS will be hosting a fundraiser on January 20 at Rural Hall Moravian Church. The event will feature more than 25 venders and food trucks. Venders will be selling an array of clothing, jewelry, soap, skin care, candles, and more. A portion of all sales will go to the local humane society and will be used for vet care and supplies.

For more information about SCHS or to donate needed items, visit stokescountyhumanesociety.org

Amanda Dodson may be reached at 336-813-2426.

Advocate and volunteer Emily Burgess fostered 345 animals through the Stokes County Humane Society in 2017.
https://www.thestokesnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/web1_EmPr.jpgAdvocate and volunteer Emily Burgess fostered 345 animals through the Stokes County Humane Society in 2017. Courtesy photos

When an animal is rescued through the Stokes County Humane Society it’s taken into foster care, vetted, given age appropriate vaccines, dewormed and groomed.
https://www.thestokesnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/web1_Em3.jpgWhen an animal is rescued through the Stokes County Humane Society it’s taken into foster care, vetted, given age appropriate vaccines, dewormed and groomed. Courtesy photos

On December 28, three newborn puppies, just a couple hours old, were dropped off in a box at a local bar. They’ll be cared for by the Stokes County Humane Society until they’re healthy and old enough to be adopted.
https://www.thestokesnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/web1_Empups.jpgOn December 28, three newborn puppies, just a couple hours old, were dropped off in a box at a local bar. They’ll be cared for by the Stokes County Humane Society until they’re healthy and old enough to be adopted. Courtesy photos

Stokes County Humane Society rescued 500 animals in 2017, 100 more than the previous year.
https://www.thestokesnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/web1_EmBl.jpgStokes County Humane Society rescued 500 animals in 2017, 100 more than the previous year. Courtesy photos

By Amanda Dodson

adodson@thestokesnews.com

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