Holiday Market reaps benefits from Small Business Saturday


‘If we don’t support our small businesses, they will go away’

By Amanda Dodson - adodson@thestokesnews.com



Ray Tuegel of Plum Granny Farm answers a customer’s question about baby ginger.


Matt Blalock | For The Stokes News

Farm volunteers, Bob and Jenny Bates, help Sumiko Healy of Germanton sign in to get her free Shop Small tote bag.


Matt Blalock | For The Stokes News

Kayla Jones of Scattered Seeds Farm works on carving at her booth at Plum Granny Farm’s Small Business Saturday Holiday Market.


Matt Blalock | For The Stokes News

Shoppers looking for a special holiday gift in Stokes County had the perfect opportunity at the 4th Annual Holiday Market held at Plum Granny’s Farm and Buffalo Creek Farm on Saturday.

“It was such a beautiful day; a perfect day for shopping small,” said Cheryl Ferguson of Plum Granny Farm. “We had a great group of vendors.”

In addition to Plum Granny Farm, nine other local farms and artisans participated: Borrowed Land Farm of Pinnacle (fresh mushrooms and grow-your-own mushroom kits), Bunny’s Trees of King (Frazier Fir trees, wreaths and white pine roping), Chad’s Chai of Winston-Salem (handcrafted teas), FarmGirl Arts of Kernersville (homegrown handspun yarns and gifts), Farmhaven of Tobaccoville (handmade pasta), Greenberries Farm of King (upcycled cork birdhouses and ornaments), Monteith Homestead of King (wreaths, dried arrangements), Mystic Wolf’s Den of King (handmade soaps, salves and bath products), and Scattered Seeds Farm of Fancy Gap (hand carved spoons).

Ferguson said there was a steady flow of familiar faces mixed with newcomers on Saturday from 10 a.m. until three. The event, held outdoors and in the greenhouse at Plum Granny Farm in King offered a wide variety of farm products such as garlic braids, turmeric, ginger, jams, mistletoe, fresh vegetables, truffles, and holiday decorations. Bunny’s Trees added some extra Christmas cheer with fresh cut Fraser Firs of all sizes, wreaths, garland, and handcrafted bows.

“What we tried to do this year was to really focus on other farms and friends with whom we sell at our farmers markets during the year. It just seems like more of a natural fit to have the products featured at our event to be farm-related,” Ferguson said. “I think what people really like about this is coming out to the farm and being able to shop in a beautiful environment. Who wouldn’t like to shop with a backdrop of the Sauratown Mountains?”

Ferguson is a strong proponent of supporting small businesses in the area and said if they don’t thrive, the community loses essential tax revenues, but also loses its soul.

“Small businesses are the lifeblood of our community, of any community. Small business owners are the folks who actually live in the community and care about it versus some huge out-of-state corporation that imports most of their products from other countries and take their profits to other states. If we don’t support our small businesses, they will go away.”

This was the last event at Plum Granny Farm this year, but they’re currently planning workshops, open greenhouse plant sales and pick-your-owns beginning in 2018.

“We just want to thank everyone for coming out to our farm on Saturday. We are always pleased to be able to partner with Buffalo Creek Farm and Creamery. Our next big joint event with them will be the Northern Triad Farm Tour next June.”

For more information about Plum Granny Farm or to sign up for their email list and get the latest information about upcoming events visit plumgrannyfarm.com or call 336-994-2517.

Amanda Dodson may be reached at 336-813-2426.

Ray Tuegel of Plum Granny Farm answers a customer’s question about baby ginger.
http://www.thestokesnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/web1_271117-blalockmatt-011.jpgRay Tuegel of Plum Granny Farm answers a customer’s question about baby ginger. Matt Blalock | For The Stokes News

Farm volunteers, Bob and Jenny Bates, help Sumiko Healy of Germanton sign in to get her free Shop Small tote bag.
http://www.thestokesnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/web1_271117-blalockmatt-0005.jpgFarm volunteers, Bob and Jenny Bates, help Sumiko Healy of Germanton sign in to get her free Shop Small tote bag. Matt Blalock | For The Stokes News

Kayla Jones of Scattered Seeds Farm works on carving at her booth at Plum Granny Farm’s Small Business Saturday Holiday Market.
http://www.thestokesnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/web1_271117-blalockmatt-012.jpgKayla Jones of Scattered Seeds Farm works on carving at her booth at Plum Granny Farm’s Small Business Saturday Holiday Market. Matt Blalock | For The Stokes News
‘If we don’t support our small businesses, they will go away’

By Amanda Dodson

adodson@thestokesnews.com

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